In the educational market, ReadSpeaker provides the benefits of its text-to-speech services to various educational segments. Schools such as Minnesota Infinity, Calgary Catholic, Georgia Virtual School, Gwinnett Online Campus, Anaheim School District, Clark County School District, The Virtual High School, SCcyber, and Southern Arkansas University Tech have integrated the ReadSpeaker services into their online programs. Major LMS providers, such as Desire2Learn and Canvas, have found that the addition of text to speech helps their partnering institutions better meet the needs of all learners, and the ease of integration provides business advantages.

ReadSpeaker integration times

ReadSpeaker integration times

In the publishing area, many providers of educational content now see the addition of text to speech as a feature that customers expect, some of those publishers include Cengage Learning, EBSCO Publishing, CICERO Systems, Rosen Publishing, and Credo Reference. John Knittel, vice president of technology for Rosen Publishing, explains why his company chose ReadSpeaker for its databases. Rosen is a 60-year-old publishing house that creates print and digital products for school and public libraries, including online databases in health, life sciences, physical sciences, digital literacy, and financial literacy. When Rosen moved into the digital space ten years ago, Knittel says the need for text to speech was “fairly obvious”. “The company chose ReadSpeaker for several reasons,” he says. Its software was the best and matched the iOS system used on iPhones and iPads. Also, because Rosen’s databases “are very dynamic, we’re constantly changing content,” he adds. With ReadSpeaker, it’s no problem to have new or updated articles covered by text to speech as soon as they are created. Plus, dealing with specialized and subject-specific vocabularies, “Rosen is picky about pronunciations,” Knittel adds. ReadSpeaker pays attention to this, and the readers’ voices are “excellent.” “ReadSpeaker offers one major benefit that tablets with built-in text to speech don’t,” says Tim Lovelace, ReadSpeaker’s director of eLearning and publishing in the U.S. If a word is mispronounced on a tablet, there is no way for an educator to fix it. But ReadSpeaker can alter the pronunciation if needed. This feature alone could be key as more schools start to take their Common Core assessments online. “Educators can be assured that each word is announced correctly. Not all text to speech is created equal,” Lovelace adds. [enhancing_learning]